What They Didn’t Tell Me About Picking Up and Moving Across The Country

My cross country journey started in Tampa, FL and ended in Louisville, CO. But I think most of these points could apply to any trip you make. 

A couple weeks ago I moved myself and everything that fit in my Honda Civic from Florida to Colorado. I needed it. My heart needed it—new people, a new environment, new coffee shops, a place to reset my equilibrium. 

DAY ONE > DAY TWO > DAYS THREE & FOUR > DAY FIVE

I knew-ish what I was getting myself into, for the most part. The obvious things, you know: a long and painful drive, and missing family, friends, my cats, and Tampa, a city I still truly love. And because I left pretty quickly, I knew job-hunting would be my first priority once I arrived.

But there were definitely a few things I didn’t and couldn’t expect, and I’m sharing them today in case you decide to relocate on a whim.

1. I wanted to go back—for a visitAt some point. Maybe it was the fact that I got hit by a car and my parents weren’t harassing nurses and doctors at the hospital for information or maybe it was after the honeymoon period of ‘I am where I’m meant to be and this is my place and my soul is set free’ but…I got the homesick bug. Because I did, essentially, leave a home I’ve known for eight years. Last night I even dreamt I moved back to Tampa.

2. Speaking of bug. I got sick and everyone knew it was going to happen but meA week-ish after I arrived I started to get the nose and throat tickle. Nothing major, nothing alarming, but something caught me. Then I was sneezing all over the place, and this morning I woke up stuffed and SICK. My cousin and new co-workers were all telling me they got the same sort of thing when they moved here—and one of them even developed allergies. Note to former self: stock up on meds before you leave.

3. Contacts ghosted me like a bad boyfriendSome of them. I made as many professional connections as I could before moving to Colorado in hopes of making the job-hunting process easier and faster once I arrived, but my inbox is still patiently waiting for replies after several very uncomfortable follow-ups.

4. I am wildly overqualified for my current positionAt this point in my job search, I am taking anything and everything I can, and that includes hourly positions folding clothes, tucking tags, and telling middle age women they look just absolutely fabulous in the newest kick crop leggings. I did not graduate with a degree in 15-minute lunch breaks, people.

5. Time zone changes really do affect things. Two hours didn’t feel like a big deal when I slowly crossed them driving out, but now that I’m here and my 8 p.m. is now my family’s 10 p.m. it’s probably too late to catch up. And when their 7:30 a.m. is my 5:30 a.m. they can’t call on their drive to work. Well, they could, but I wouldn’t be too happy. It’s taking some getting used to.

6. I ran out of data the third dayI don’t know where the hell I’m going out here. None of the highway numbers make sense and with an already poor sense of direction, I was crutching on Google Maps to get me everywhere. Now I get to pay almost double my monthly phone bill because of my idiocy.

7. I overpaid for all my groceries the first weekThere’s this adorable Whole Foods-esque grocery store near me called Alfalfa’s, and because I didn’t do my research to find out there was a Kroger-esque grocery store one block further, I was paying out the @$$ for produce that has probably been sung to and tucked into bed at night. Lesson learned.

8. I never want to run on the roads againNow that I’m in trail and mountain country, I never ever want to (or need to) run on the roads unless the trails are closed for a burn or due to bad weather conditions. There are hundreds of beautiful off-road trails that make me so thankful for this amazing place.

9. I break out in spontaneous tears over the beauty of this placeI can’t believe it has taken me this long to see this amazing state. But, damn, I’m happy I am here.

Ever moved to a new place? Tell me about it. 

Push on, PUSH ANIMALS >>>

7 Replies to “What They Didn’t Tell Me About Picking Up and Moving Across The Country”

  1. I packed up and moved from Australia to England when I was 24. I remember leaving Brissie airport on a 30 degree C December morning and landing at Heathrow to be greeted by a rainy 2 degree miserable winter evening. With only a suitcase full of clothes to my name, no job, no house and no clue, I was pretty damn scared! Worked out alright in the end but it was one crazy learning curve!

  2. Lindsay, love your name by the way, this might seem like a really tough move BUT remember that you have probably been through tougher challenges in your life. In order to find the perfect job, it will take time. Do you know of any corporations in the area where you could start out at the bottom and work your way up at? Just a thought … because even if you don’t have the perfect job at first you’re in the perfect area and you can live for the weekends at first! 🙂

    1. Lindsay is SUCH a great name, isn’t it?! haha! Yes, you make a great point. I definitely feel lucky that I am even finding jobs–no matter what they are–because a lot of people aren’t as lucky. I think the ones I have found will be great.

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